Monthly Archives: January 2013

Calling all cancer patients – just BE POSITIVE!

“You just have to be positive and you’ll be okay!”

GrumpyCatNotPositive

How many times have you heard someone say this?   It really, really isn’t that simple.  In fact, to say that to someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, even when meant kindly, isn’t helpful at all.

How does it feel to hear this when your life has been turned upside-down, you’re maybe struggling with the side-effects of treatment and in a deep dark hole grieving the loss of your old life or hopes and dreams for your future?  Does this platitude make you feel better?

When I was first diagnosed I experienced emotions ranging from feeling like a failure because I got cancer in the first place, to wanting to smack anyone who told me to ‘just be positive’!

It’s been a popular notion for many years that if you have a positive attitude you won’t get cancer or you can get rid of it or it won’t come back again.  To be told that you ‘have’ to be positive places an enormous weight  onto your already burdened shoulders.

As if it isn’t bad enough just dealing with the physical aspect of cancer treatment, even with a good prognosis it’s absolutely normal question whether you are going to survive.  If you believed that you had many more years/decades ahead of you and now you’ve been confronted with your mortality, it’s perfectly natural to be depressed and frightened.

If you have cancer and start believing that all you need is to be positive, how will you feel if despite the best efforts of your doctors and other health advisers, your cancer doesn’t respond to treatment?  Does this make you a failure?  Does it mean you didn’t try hard enough?  The answer to both those questions is a resounding NO.

It’s vital that you take this misguided belief and chuck it as far away from you as you can.  Imagine you’re on top of a high cliff and the be-positive notion is something you can pick up and hurl out into the depths of the ocean.

There is nothing wrong with being optimistic, which is a very different thing to the popular interpretation of being positive.  Being optimistic still allows for times when you feel afraid or worried.  Whatever emotions you experience are okay; feelings aren’t good or bad, they just are.  If you don’t feel as though you have permission to feel down sometimes rather than up all the time, you run the risk of being stuck in the uncomfortable feelings.  You need to acknowledge these emotions before you can release them.  Pretending by trying to be positive all the time, only makes those feelings stronger and harder to let go.

The best thing to do when you’re feeling depressed, anxious or just plain terrified, is to talk to someone who will listen without trying to fix things for you

Finding somewhere to off-load everything you’re feeling takes the power out of your challenging emotions and you will move to a calmer place much more quickly.

This is where cancer support groups can be very helpful because everyone there ‘gets it’.  To be validated for what you are feeling is the best way to be able to eventually move forward.  Each time you are acknowledged for what you are going through, those feelings become less powerful.

When people tell you that you have to be positive, what they are doing is making it easier for themselves to not have to worry about you.  Guess what, they are coming from fear too.

The best way to respond when someone tells you to be positive is to let them know that this doesn’t make you feel better and in fact is unhelpful.  Perhaps they need to walk in your shoes to fully understand, but most people will back off once you tell them how you feel when they give you this sort of advice.

Unless you have asked for their opinion or advice no one has the right to give it to you.

And even if you did ask them, you still have the right to say what feels helpful and what doesn’t.

If being honest with these people doesn’t work then whenever you see them I suggest you move away from them as soon as you can.  Surround yourself with people who are brave enough to be with you when you feel depressed or frightened and offer nothing more than their accepting presence.

For those people who don’t know what to do when faced with someone who is distressed, it’s really easy – you don’t have to DO anything!  If you feel you must say something, make it as simple as, “I can see you’re having a tough time today.  I’m so sorry”.

One thing I am positive about is that anyone who can sit with me when I’m in emotional pain, without telling me what to do, is a true friend.

© Jane Gillespie

google.com/+JANEGILLESPIEHolisticCounsellor