Category Archives: Cancer Survivor stories

WORDS OF WISDOM

Today I came across this old article written by Nina Lamparski in the Wentworth Courier, 21st March 2007

Counsellor Jane Gillespie’s book “Journey to Me” openly talks about her battle with cancer.

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Author Jane Gillespie had just finished her chemotherapy when she decided to run away. “I’d bottled up all my feelings about having cancer and once the treatment ended I suffered a breakdown,” she explained. “I just had to pack up and leave.”

The Canberra mother of three had been diagnosed with a malignant lump in her breast in 1994, a “harrowing experience” that would turn her “whole world upside-down” & push her to flee to Sydney.

In the autobiographical Journey to Me, to be published on 24th March 2007, Ms Gillespie recounts how the pressure to shield those close to her from the emotional trauma became impossible. “Cancer is not just a physical illness,” she said. “It literally eats you up from the inside. You feel like you can’t share it with your family and friends. You want to protect them and not burden them even more. Eventually I couldn’t stand this anymore.”

But her impromptu move interstate did not provide the relief Ms Gillespie had hoped for. “I thought I could leave the past behind and yet it followed me. Imagine my shock when I discovered I’d brought myself with me.”

In the end, “I believe it was joining a Life Force Cancer Foundation support group that saved my life”, Ms Gillespie said. The not-for-profit organisation, which has support groups in the Eastern Suburbs and Inner West, helps cancer survivors deal with the emotional aftermath of their illness. There is also a separate Inner West group for carers.

Ms Gillespie, who now works as a Life Force counsellor, said she hoped her book would fulfill a similar role.

“I really want people to understand that there’s life after cancer but also that it’s okay to be down and feel negative at times,” she said. “Being open about what’s going on inside of you is a vital part of the healing process.”

Jane Gillespie is one of Life Force Cancer Foundation’s Counsellors. Life Force is a non-profit organisation, providing emotional/psychosocial support for people dealing with the experience of cancer, through a range of support programs and therapies including group work and meditation, counselling special and retreats. Support groups are held weekly in Sydney’s metropolitan area.

More information about Jane or Life Force can be found at these websites;

www.janegillespie.com.au                         www.lifeforce.org.au

 

CAN COUNSELLING HELP CANCER PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES?

Receiving a diagnosis of cancer is a traumatic experience. One minute you’re ‘normal’ and the next your entire life has been turned upside down.

despairIt can be hard, even impossible, to talk to family members or friends about the roller-coaster of emotions that you have been commandeered into riding. When someone is diagnosed with cancer, they and their family can feel shocked, disbelieving, frightened, without direction or simply numb. Talking things through in confidence with someone who understands the emotional challenges of cancer can be extremely helpful.

Speaking individually to an experienced cancer counsellor can ease the sense of isolation you may feel and help you to find ways of facing the challenges ahead. This also applies to family members, friends and colleagues. By talking privately to a counsellor they can explore their anxiety, grief and any other emotions openly and honestly without needing to shield the person who is ill.

Why cancer counselling?

Research shows that counselling can be significantly useful in helping individuals and families face and meet the many challenges that a cancer diagnosis brings with it. This has been demonstrated to improve their quality of life.

During counselling, patients and families can learn how to cope more easily with their emotional issues. This helps them to communicate their needs better when speaking to Health professionals.

Counselling helps in easing any tension in relationships with family and friends. Optimistic but realistic outlooks replace the burden of positive expectations. Just saying “I’m being positive” doesn’t actually mean much, although being optimistic can always help you to enjoy life more in the here and now. However, if fears are present (and why wouldn’t they be?), then it is healthy to talk about these and get them out into the light of day.

How might you feel?

Some responses that people may feel when they are told they have cancer:

  • Shock: “What?? No!”
  • Denial / Disbelief: “It’s a mistake, those aren’t MY test results.”
  • Withdrawal: “I can’t/don’t want to talk to anyone.”
  • Feeling isolated: “Nobody understands.”
  • Anger: (“*#@^!!!”)
  • Loss: “But I’ve so much more I want to do with my life.”
  • Body image issues: “Will I look like a freak?”
  • Fears associated with sexuality and intimacy: “No one will every desire me now.”
  • Fear and uncertainty: “What’s going to happen to me?”

Anything you feel is valid and deserves to be acknowledged, not only by those around you, but also by you, yourself.

Seeking individual counselling or becoming part of a support group may be where you can find this acknowledgment.

After a cancer diagnosis, you might feel as though you have no control over what is happening to you and this can be very frightening. Uncertainty is often one of the most difficult things to deal with. You might feel as though cancer and its treatment have taken total control of your life and this can lead to feelings of powerlessness.

Counselling allows you to take back some control over your life and provides you with some semblance of security again. It can help you to enjoy your life despite the illness.

While it can be terrifying to think about it, it is natural to want to know what is likely to happen to you, so that you can plan for your future.

Sorting out your affairs so that everything is in order can be very confronting but it can also be helpful. Even though it’s likely to be painful for you and your family to talk about dying, it can also provide an opportunity to talk about what is important to you all and develop deeper levels of intimacy with each other. Regardless of how long the cancer patient lives, everyone benefits by being open and honest about what they value in their relationships.

Many cancer patients feel as if they have lost control of their lives. Talking to a counsellor or others going through a similar experience can help you to regain a level of control over how you cope.

To find out about support groups go to http://www.lifeforce.org.au

© Jane Gillespie

 

How joining a cancer support group can help you in remission

It can be distressing trying to tell people who haven’t had cancer how it feels, no matter where you are on the journey.  However, this can be especially true for people who are in remission.

Popular mythology is that you’re okay now, you’re better, so why aren’t you celebrating?  Even the survivor often thinks this way and then feels guilty because this isn’t their truth.

The reality is that as more people survive cancer, it has become apparent that survivorship has its own challenges.  Often there are lifelong side effects as a result of treatment and while it’s great that you did survive, your new life can be very different to your pre-cancer one.

Even if most side effects eventually disappear it can take a long time to recover your energy and feel up to tackling the most mundane tasks.  The shock felt after receiving a diagnosis of a life threatening illness and the uncertainty about whether it will come back can take years to come to terms with.

Cancer treatment isn’t something anyone would volunteer for and the various regimens for it can be brutal.  The onslaught of surgery, toxic drugs and being burnt by radiation very often leaves psychological as well as physical scars.

The best way to deal with this is to talk with others who really do understand – fellow survivors.  By being able to express all your feelings about your cancer journey to people who have shared that experience is a valuable way of making sense of it.  This can be a great help when trying to work out what your new normal is and finding ways of accepting that.

With the best will in the world, it is impossible for people who have not been through it to really understand. Join a support group as soon as you can; you will find help and encouragement throughout the whole process.  However, it is never too late to join a group.

One member of the organization I work with (www.lifeforce.org.au) came to us 16 years after his diagnosis and discovered why he hadn’t felt truly alive for all that time: he had never had anywhere to process what he’d been through.

This quote says it all (from Bill W, one of the founders of AA):

“All we have to share is our experience; what we have not experienced, we cannot share.”

This is not only true for cancer patients, survivors and their families but for anyone who has had life throw a curve ball at them.

Never be afraid to ask for help.  It isn’t a sign of weakness but of strength, and shows a willingness to do whatever you can to get your life back on track.

www.janegillespie.net

HAVE YOU BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH CANCER?

Receiving a diagnosis of cancer is a traumatic experience.  One minute you’re ‘normal’ and the next your entire life has been turned upside down.

It can be hard, even impossible, to talk to family members or friends about the roller-coaster of emotions that you have been commandeered into riding.  When someone is diagnosed with cancer, they and their family can feel shocked, disbelieving, frightened, without direction or simply numb. Talking things through in confidence with someone who understands the emotional challenges of cancer can be extremely helpful.

Speaking individually to an experienced cancer counsellor can ease the sense of isolation you may feel and help you to find ways of facing the challenges ahead.  This also applies to family members, friends and colleagues.  By talking to a counsellor they can explore their concerns and anxieties openly without needing to shield the person who is ill.

Why cancer counselling?

Research shows that counselling can be significantly useful in helping individuals and families face and meet the many challenges that a cancer diagnosis brings with it.  This has been shown to improve their quality of life.

During counselling, patients and families can learn how to cope more easily with their emotional issues. This helps them to communicate their needs better when speaking to Health professionals.

Counselling helps in easing any tension in relationships with family and friends. Optimistic but realistic outlooks replace the burden of positive expectations.  Just saying “I’m being positive” doesn’t actually mean much, although being optimistic can always help you to enjoy life more in the here and now.  However, if fears are present (and why wouldn’t they be?), then it is healthy to talk about these and get them out into the light of day.

How might you feel?

Some responses you might have to receiving a diagnosis of cancer:

  • Shock: “What??  No!”
  • Denial / Disbelief: “It’s a mistake, those aren’t MY test results.”
  • Withdrawal: “I can’t/don’t want to talk to anyone.”
  • Feeling isolated: “Nobody understands.”
  • Anger: (“*#@^!!!”)
  • Loss: “But I’ve so much more I want to do with my life.”
  • Body image issues: “Will I look like a freak?”
  • Fears associated with sexuality and intimacy:  “No one will every desire me now.”
  • Fear and uncertainty: “What’s going to happen to me?”

Anything you feel is valid and deserves to be acknowledged, not only by those around you, but also by you.

Seeking individual counselling or becoming part of a support group can help you to find this acknowledgment.

After a cancer diagnosis, you might feel as though you have no control over what is happening to you and this can be very frightening.  Uncertainty is often one of the most difficult things to deal with.  You might feel as though cancer and its treatment have taken total control of your life and this often leads to feelings of powerlessness.

Counselling allows you to take back some control over your life and provides you with some semblance of security again. It can help you to enjoy your life despite the illness.

While it can be terrifying to think about it, it is natural to want to know what is likely to happen to you so that you can plan for your future.

Sorting out your affairs so that everything is in order is often very confronting but it can also be helpful.  Even though it’s likely to be painful for you and your family to talk about dying, it can also provide an opportunity to talk about what is important to you all and develop deeper levels of intimacy with each other.  Regardless of how long the cancer patient lives, everyone benefits by being open and honest about what they value in their relationships.

Many cancer patients feel as if they have lost control of their lives.  Talking to a counsellor can help you to regain a level of control over how you cope.

http://www.janegillespie.net

Grieving the loss of a breast

After I had my mastectomy the breast cancer service did their best to match me with a volunteer in their peer support service but unfortunately the closest they could come up with was a woman who was 15 years younger than I when she was diagnosed, happily married and who had radiotherapy, not chemo like me.  About the only thing that we had in common was that we’d both had a mastectomy.

She told me, of course it didn’t worry her that she’d lost a breast; her husband loved her anyway.  Five years before my diagnosis my husband had walked out leaving me with our youngest child to raise.   All I could think was that if a man left me when I was whole, what chance did I have of anyone else wanting me now I was mutilated?

The volunteer said that her teenage children kept her spirits up by including her in all their activities and that her parents had been a tower of strength, stepping in when her husband needed to go to work. Her sisters took her to the hospital and minded the children when her husband took her away for a week to a spa to celebrate the end of her treatment.  My son lived in another city, my older daughter had a toddler to look after, my younger girl was born with a disability, my widowed mother was quite frail and my only sibling lived in New Zealand.

Five years down the track the woman I spoke to never thought about the fact that she’d had breast cancer, and life was ‘wonderful’.  I felt guilty because I didn’t want to hear about how marvellous her life was when mine was bloody horrible.

I know she was trying to give me hope but at the time I felt as though no one wanted to hear how devastated I was; that my fears were foolish.

So I just got on with things, putting on a brave face.  I told everyone that it was ‘only a breast’ after all. The important thing was that I was alive… wasn’t it?  When I looked back on that horrendous year I could see that while I might have been walking around, I certainly wasn’t ‘alive’.

The other women in the breast cancer support group I attended were unrelentingly upbeat.  The implication was that if you weren’t positive all the time you either wouldn’t get through it or the cancer would come back.  It seemed no one wanted to hear how I truly felt.

At the end of my treatment I had a breakdown.  I left town, sending my daughter to live with her father.  It was a year before I was able to work again.  My new oncologist referred me to the most wonderful support group.  I was encouraged to express all the feelings I had about having breast cancer and how frightened I was that every ache and pain must be bone cancer and every headache a brain tumour.  Their loving acceptance of exactly where I was at was the best possible medicine for me at that time.

It wasn’t until after reconstructive surgery that I realised that I’d never grieved the loss of my breast.  I chose to have an operation where my new breast was made using tissue from my tummy – major surgery.

After the operation, I was felled by the most intense anger.  I’d been so desperate to have the surgery that I didn’t really let myself think about how huge it was and how it could all have gone wrong.  But now that it was over, I was consumed with rage about the fact that if I hadn’t had this **** of a disease and lost my breast I wouldn’t have had to put myself through three separate donations of my own blood in the weeks before the operation, ten hours of anaesthetic and micro-surgery, followed by the torture of being forced to lie completely still in the one position for 12 hours after I woke up.

Because I was studying counselling at the time I realised that this anger was actually grief at the loss of my breast.  A classmate came to visit me and let me get all the tears, anger, hurt and pain off my chest – no pun intended!

My reconstructed breast is wonderful and despite the emotional agony I went through afterwards, I have never regretted having the surgery.  I’m just sorry that I didn’t know how to grieve losing my original breast before I made the decision to have the surgery.

Today, I can believe that the volunteer was telling me the truth about her husband because I have now had a wonderful relationship with a beautiful man who wasn’t at all fazed by my battle scars.

www.janegillespie.net